Discourse & Process Chat with Rachel Vorona Cote

When:
October 26, 2020 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
2020-10-26T16:00:00-04:00
2020-10-26T17:00:00-04:00
Cost:
Free
Contact:
413-551-5100

This online program will be streamed live via Zoom. Registration closes one hour prior to the event start time.

“This comprehensive book perfectly interweaves academic scholarship, engaging storytelling, and extremely convincing arguments that will convert even those who think suffrage solved all of our problems. Anyone who has ever been told to sit down, shush, and that little girls should be seen and not heard, this one’s for you.”Good Housekeeping

Written in the tradition of Shrill, Dead Girls, Sex Object and other frank books about the female gaze, TOO MUCH encourages women to reconsider the beauty of their excesses-emotional, physical, and spiritual. Rachel Vorona Cote braids cultural criticism, theory, and storytelling together in her exploration of how culture grinds away our bodies, souls, and sexualities, forcing us into smaller lives than we desire. An erstwhile Victorian scholar, she sees many parallels between that era’s fixation on women’s “hysterical” behavior and our modern policing of the same; in the space of her writing, you’re as likely to encounter Jane Eyre and Lizzie Bennet as you are Britney Spears and Lana Del Rey. This book will tell the story of how women, from then and now, have learned to draw power from their reservoirs of feeling, all that makes us “Too Much.”

To purchase this book, please visit our affiliate page at Bookshop.org. Bookshop is an online bookstore with a mission to financially support local, independent bookstores. The Mount will receive 10-30% of the proceeds of sale when accessed from this page.

Rachel Vorona Cote is the author of Too Much: How Victorian Constraints Still Bind Women Today, which was published in February 2020 by Grand Central. She also contributes to a variety of publications, including The Nation, The New Republic, Hazlitt, and Longreads and teaches a nonfiction writing course at Catapult. Previously, she was a contributing writer at Jezebel. She lives in Takoma Park, Maryland, with her husband and cat.

 

Julie Scelfo is a journalist, author and justice advocate who helps people discover the forces that help shape human thinking. Previously, Scelfo was a staff writer for The New York Times, and a Correspondent at Newsweek where she covered breaking news. Scelfo is  the author of The Women Who Made New York, a collection of intersectional biographies that reveal how it was women — and not just men — who built one of the world’s greatest cities.

Scelfo earned a Bachelor of Arts, cum laude from Barnard College, Columbia University, and a Master’s degree in Media Ecology from New York University. She lives in New                                                     York City, is a frequent public speaker and has made numerous appearances on                                                             television, radio and podcasts.